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July, 2013:

Going to vietnam for 3 day lone traveller vacation any tips?

Hi I’m going to vietnam for 3 days and I really don’t want to go on a package tour and would like to explore on my own, is there any suggestions where to go? I really like visiting old places, rustic ancient villages or ruins, mountains, forests, beaches! and eat local food along the streets. Thanks! Looking forward to what people can say about this.

This is a hard one to answer, partly because you didn’t say which part of vietnam you are going to. It is either going to be Hanoi or Ho Chi Minh City. 3 days is not a lot of time, as you are likely to fly in during the morning and leave in the afternoon, so you get 1 full day and 2 half days.

For the full day the best option is to join a tour. I know, I know, sounds boring, but there are lots of little one day tours so that you can see a lot, get out into the countryside, without having to work everything out for yourself, deal with other hassles and things.

You can often book the tours the night before. In Ho Chi Minh City we booked local tour at night for the next morning. Half the people on the tour were vietnamese. Basically we went around the Me Kong Delta,.

In Hanoi the main day tour is Ha Long Bay, which is really touristy, you might be better off looking for a day tour to a little village like Mai Chau (we did an overnight stay, cycling around most of the next day before returning to Hanoi)

Hanoi is possibly the best for history, temples and museums. But also the food and beer. While there are well known touristy places with great food, our best experiences were drinking and eating in street restaurants.

Will oolong tea work for the thai iced tea that is sold in thai restaurants?

im trying to make the thai iced tea that is sold in Thai Restaurants. my mom bought oolong tea. will it work???

absolutely! The thai iced tea is just black tea. Oolong tea is kinda like black tea with a more mild and subtle flavor. I think you’ll like it!

What’s the difference between kamsahamnida and komap sumnida in Korean?

I know they both mean thank you. I try to say komap sumnida when I go to a Korean Restaurant or to a korean store but everyone always answers kamsahamnida. I hear kamsahamnida all the time but I never hear komapsumnida. Why? I live in California.

kamsahamnida has a Sino-Korean (Chinese) root in the beginning "kamsa (which comes from the Chinese "gan xie" meaning "to thanks/appreciate"). komapsumnida is purely Korean. They’re both commonly used and are both in polite forms. Many will habitually say kamsahamnida but from what I’ve learned, they’re making an effort to say things in pure Korean if there are equivalents. Last year, I went to Korea and all of the announcements (i.e. on the plane, at department stores and on the radio news, etc.) all used komapsumnida at the end.

The best street food in Saigon, Vietnam

0 The best street food in Saigon, VietnamTo learn more visit us at http://xotours.vn/Our_Tours/The_Foodie.html

The Foodie is no ordinary Food tour, but a fantastic way to see the city of Saigon at night and eat a variety of delicious street food! Experience Vietnam the way it was meant to be seen….on the back of a motorbike! See parts of the city that most tourists never get to see and experience it with our super fun, all-female crew of amazing drivers!

Duration : 0:9:54

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Lip-Licking Royal Thai Food at Bangkok’s Krua OV (ครัว OV)

0 Lip Licking Royal Thai Food at Bangkoks Krua OV (ครัว OV)For delicious royal Thai food and marvelous curries go to Krua OV (ครัว OV). Get all the information here – http://www.eatingthaifood.com/2013/06/royal-thai-food-at-bangkoks-classy-krua-ov/

Khao gaeng is a Thai term that means rice and curry. Normally the dishes are prepared and waiting to be ordered as soon as you arrive at the restaurant. It’s an everyday food in Thailand and you’ll find khao gaeng stalls throughout the country and all over Bangkok. But there’s one restaurant known as Krua OV (ครัว OV) that’s located within the lush Dusit government district of Bangkok, and they serve not only curries, but a selection of amazing royal Thai food as well. The chefs of the restaurant have long routes of royal cooking in the royal courts of Thailand. That being said, I can tell you for sure, you’re in good hands when you eat at Krua OV (ครัว OV).

As many Thai food connoisseurs say, Khao Chae (ข้าวแช่) is one of the best and most important examples of royal Thai food cooking – and they happen to be very famous throughout Bangkok for it. So that’s exactly what I started out with, not wanting to miss it. The platter came neatly decorated with a full plate of mixed goodies included fried pork, sweet pork, and a chili stuffed with pork and deep fried in an egg net. Along with the deep fried selection of fragrant tidbits, Khao Chae (ข้าวแช่) would not be complete without the essential jasmine rice in a pool of ice water. Yes, it’s a bizarre combination, but after you try them ingredients and jasmine rice water together, you’ll realize just how refreshing it is. When it comes to royal Thai food cuisine, you should try Khao Chae (ข้าวแช่).

Along with Khao Chae (ข้าวแช่) we ordered Gaeng Garee Gai (แกงกะหรี่ไก่) which is chicken curry simmered in spices and coconut milk. It’s similar to the famous massaman curry, but I prefer this version as it’s a little less sweet and a little more flavor. With some rice, it was fabulous. Then came Pla Duk Foo Pad Prik King (ปลาดุกฟูผัดพริกขิง), a deep fried fluff of catfish that was super flavorful and topped with fried basil leaves. It was crispy and offered a ton of flavor and texture with a good kick of ginger. Then came Kai Paloe (ไข่พะโล้), which is a Chinese inspired Thai dish that consists of thick chunks of pork belly simmers for a long time in Chinese five spice and combined with eggs. It’s a little sweet, and kind of a comfort dish rather than a royal Thai food. A few plates of rice and I was a very happy diner at Krua OV (ครัว OV). While not all the dishes at the restaurant are royal Thai food, they do have a few dishes that are authentic and royal, and other that are occasionally cooked and perfected in the royal Thai courts. This restaurant is peaceful, unique, and the food is fantastic!

Address: 199 Thanon Pichai, Kwang, Nakhon Chaisi, Kate Dusit, Bangkok
Phone: 0-22431980
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ov.catering
Prices: You’ll pay around 100 – 200 THB per person for a fabulous feast
How to Get There: It’s a little out of place, but Krua OV (OV Kitchen) ครัว OV, is located in the royal government area of Dusit in Bangkok and across the street from the Bangkok zoo. You can take the BTS to Victory Monument, and from there it’s easiest to take a taxi or bus to Thanon Phichai, which is across from the zoo. The restaurant is within the gate a little ways down the road. It’s a unique restaurant to sample some royal Thai food and marvelous curries.
199 ถนน.พิชัย แขวง ถนนนครไชยศรี เขตดุสิต กรุงเทพ
เปิด จันทร์ – เสาร์
โทร. 0-22431980

Follow my food adventures at http://migrationology.com/ & http://www.eatingthaifood.com/
Bangkok Travel Guide: http://migrationology.com/ebook-101-things-to-do-in-bangkok/
Thai Food Guide: http://www.eatingthaifood.com/eating-thai-food-guide/
Finally, subscribe so you don’t miss the next tasty adventure http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=migrationology

Duration : 0:6:32

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Eating Korean Food in Thailand | Delicious Korean Meal (김치전 & 군만두) at the Korea House in Chiang Mai

0 Eating Korean Food in Thailand | Delicious Korean Meal (김치전 & 군만두) at the Korea House in Chiang MaiIn our latest travel video we head to a Korean Restaurant (Korea House) in Chiang Mai to satisfy our urge to eat Korean food by devouring Kimchi pancakes/pizza (김치전) and Pan Fried Dumplings (군만두). These are two of our favorite Korean dishes and seeing them before our very eyes, once again, cast our minds back to when we first started dating in Korea.

Having left Korea only three months ago, we’ve honestly really missed eating Korean food more than we ever would have anticipated. Although, we certainly enjoy Korean food, we both often dreamed of Thai and Indian curries while living as teachers in the former Hermit Kingdom.

Whenever we’ve had a clamoring for Korean food we’ve tried our best to find a Korean restaurant in SE Asia. A couple of months ago we had an amazing feast at a Korean Restaurant, Daebak, in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

This meal, although delicious, didn’t compare to that incredible experience; however, the food here was definitely good.

One funny quirk about this restaurant is that it charged for the side dishes which are ALWAYS free at Korean restaurants in Korea. We found the portions quite generous, but since we had eyes bigger than our stomachs, we ended up ordering a second round of everything! That was a big mistake as we left feeling bloated as opposed to comfortably full.

It was a complete diet fail for me, the guy who is supposedly trying to lose the blogger belly once and for all this summer. For me, it’s always comfort foods or cravings that cause me to temporarily fall off the wagon, when it comes healthy eating and/or dieting.

Overall, the meal cost just over 300 Baht (roughly $10 USD) for the initial course and 200 Baht more for round two (just under $7 USD). Compared to local Thai food in Chiang Mai, it’s definitely a bit of a splurge; hence, we won’t be eating here too often.

If you’re looking to visit this restaurant it’s located on the Northeast corner of the gated city center. It’s nearby Mike’s Burgers and El Diablo Mexican restaurant:

http://nomadicsamuel.com/video-blog/korean-meal-in-chiang-mai

This is part of our Travel in Thailand series. We’re making a series of videos showcasing Thai culture, Thai arts, Thai foods, Thai religion and Thai people.

Proudly presented by: http://nomadicsamuel.com , http://smilingfacestravelphotos.com , http://thatbackpacker.com & http://backpacking-travel-blog.com

All photos and video taken by Samuel Jeffery (Nomadic Samuel) and Audrey Bergner (That Backpacker).

This video features the song ‘Go Cart”‘ from Kevin Macleod available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Commercial license.

Duration : 0:3:57

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Sake and Teriyaki at NYC’s Best New Japanese Restaurant Robataya

0 Sake and Teriyaki at NYCs Best New Japanese Restaurant RobatayaChristian Finnegan and Camille Ford taste organic and locally sourced dishes and have a paddle competition at one of Manhattan’s best Japanese Restaurants, Robataya.

Don’t miss an episode of customNation! Subscribe here: http://bit.ly/customSubscribe

Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/customNationshow
Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/customnationtv

Duration : 0:3:26

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Best Chinese Restaurant: Yu & You Big Test – Gordon Ramsay

0 Best Chinese Restaurant: Yu & You Big Test   Gordon RamsayChinese Restaurant Yu & You, get put to the test by having to serve food in Gordon Ramsay’s Restaurant, and impress 20 esteemed guests.

Gordon Ramsay in search of Britain’s best restaurant. Top restaurants from around the UK compete to win the title.

Click here to watch the “Ramsay’s Best Restaurant” playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIBJfOTecpg&list=PLCF045EC284533D2A&feature=plpp_play_all

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The official Youtube channel of Gordon Ramsay with exclusive clips from a selection shows including Cook-a-long Live, Gordon’s Great Escape and more.

To find out more about Gordon Ramsay visit:

http://www.gordonramsay.com

Gordon Ramsay on Facebook

http://www.facebook.com/Gordonramsay01

Follow Gordon Ramsay on Twitter

http://twitter.com/#!/GordonRamsay01

Standard Tags:
“gordon ramsay” “michelin star” “Hell’s Kitchen” nightmares “The F Word” Cooking Restaurant Savoy Connaught “Boxwood Cafe” “gordon ramsey” petrus maze savoy grill menus summer autumn spring menus “christmas recipe” #gordonramsay #kitchennightmares #ramsay “ramsay’s best restaurant” “best restaurant”

Duration : 0:3:20

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